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AWARD PROGRAM TYPES
SERVICES AND PUBLICATION TOPICS

DISCIPLINES
ORGANIZATIONS

LOCATION: GEOGRAPHIC ELIGIBILITY

DEADLINES
OTHER CRITERIA: RESTRICTIONS AND ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS


Making the most of NYFA Source

The primary characteristic of any organization included in NYFA Source is that it offers a formal, ongoing program or service designed specifically for or sensitive to the needs of individual artists. Although many organizations provide support for artists in either informal ways or as part of their general service to the community, they are not included in the database unless they meet the above criteria. Similarly, organizations that provide support to arts organizations or groups but do not offer awards or services for individuals have not been listed.

Program records are grouped under their administrating or host organization. Each organization in the database may have one or more program listings. There are three basic program categories: Awards, Services, and Publications.

AWARDS
Programs that are competitive in nature and result in the award of a prize, grant, or service to individual artists.

SERVICES
Programs that offer services to artists for free or for hire. Services may or may not be available on a competitive basis.

PUBLICATIONS
NYFA Source offers a listing of publications geared specifically to individual artists, including books, periodicals, newsletters and online publications.



AWARD PROGRAM TYPES

1. Cash Grant/Monetary Award. Programs that award money directly to an individual artist in the form of a prize or grant. Funds may be unrestricted or restricted.

2. Emergency Grants. Cash Grant/Monetary Awards specifically for artists facing serious illness or catastrophic events or other difficulties. Although some organizations award emergency "grants," others may provide financial support on more informal, ongoing basis along with other in-kind supports and services. [Not to be confused with Special Opportunity funding, also listed under Cash Grant/Monetary Award, which may be available on a short-term basis to enable an artist to take advantage of a professional opportunity.]

3. Student Scholarships. Restricted Cash Grant/Monetary Awards for students specifically intended to fund education or training in formal academic settings.

4. Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs. The primary purpose of the programs in this category is to enable artists to live and work at an institution or place where they normally do not live or work. Programs listed as residency awards in NYFA Source also include at least one of the following: fellowship with other artists; time, space or specialized equipment to engage in their craft; and, in some cases, a stipend toward living expenses or materials.

Please Note: Organizations use the term "residency" in numerous and sometimes conflicting ways to describe programs. No standard definition has been uniformly adopted by the field. Unlike a space program, however, the term residency generally implies an added value or service, either on the part of the artist or the host organization. Furthermore, residencies can take place in a variety of settings and can be artist-focused (an arts colony) or more externally service-oriented (artists working in an elementary school). The following program categories may include some residency characteristics and offer similar advantages for an artist, but do not fall within the NYFA Source definition of a formal residency program.

See Services Section for Residency opportunities that are not awarded, free of charge, or substantially subsidized.

5. Space Awards (Live and/or Work). Programs in this category provide the artist with free or subsidized live and work space with few, if any, other service components included. [See Services section for space or facilities rental programs.]

6. Equipment Access Awards. Programs in this category award access to equipment or raw materials used in the production of art with few, if any, other service components included. Examples include the award of access to editing equipment to a filmmaker or the award or free loan of an instrument to a musician. [See Services section for noncompetitive programs and for equipment and facilities rental programs.]

7. Apprenticeship/Professional Development Award Programs. The primary purpose of programs in this category is to provide training or apprenticeship; the most common areas for apprenticeships programs are in the "trades" such as lighting design, or folk arts. This category also includes professional development and peer assistance opportunities for mid-career and mature artists.

Professional (Organizational) Internships. Program in which an emerging artist, arts administrator, or other art professional performs support or assistance work in exchange for professional development opportunities and mentorship.

Folklife or Folk Arts Apprenticeships. These provide an opportunity for an emerging or mid-career artist to apprentice with a master folk artist in order to preserve or pass on a tradition of work. Usually funded through a grant that supports the master artist's fee and some of the apprentice's expenses.

Professional Development Programs. Programs for practicing artists that provide a significant career development opportunity free of charge through a competitive application process. Benefits may include development, workshopping, or presentation of work-in-progress, mentorship, peer interaction, professional contacts or career training, or instruction/experimentation in a new form or medium.

8. Honorary Prizes. An award or prize granted to artists that confers significant honor, recognition, or visibility, but HAS NO MONEY ATTACHED. A prime example of this would the Academy Awards (Oscars). Although these programs will not directly fund an artist's work, they can have a significant impact on the development of an artist's career.

9. Hybrid Programs. In some cases, an award program may include benefits common to more than one award type. In such cases we have listed the program according to what is deemed to be the primary benefit to the artist.

A cash grant may include a secondary residency component, as follows:

(a) The awarded artist performs a short-term residency or workshop at the granting institution largely for the purpose of adding value for the institution's constituents. This may figure into the awardee's public service requirement.

(b) A residency, generally short-term, is provided as an additional, supplementary benefit to the artist.

Residencies, Apprenticeships, or Professional Development programs may, in some cases, include a monetary award, frequently as a stipend for living, travel, materials, or production expenses associated with the residency.

a. Unrestricted and Restricted. Some grants, such as state-funded artist fellowships, are unrestricted; i.e. to be used as the artist needs or sees fit. Other grants are restricted, i.e. must be used for specific projects or special opportunities, or other designated expenses.

Examples:

Unrestricted Grants

  • Unrestricted cash grants or fellowships--to support an artist's work or livelihood in general, and to be used at the artist's discretion.

  • Lifetime, special achievement, or recognition awards, often conferred by nomination or selection.


Competition Prize Money (Also Usually Unrestricted)

  • Literary or Playwriting competitions which confer cash prizes (award may include publication and/or a reading/production).

  • Music or Ballet (Performance) competitions, which can offer cash prizes (award may include performance opportunities, professional contacts, and mentorship of some kind.


Restricted Grants

  • Project grants. Grants awarded in response to a proposal for a specific artist project. Projects might include a performance event or production; installation or art work; media project; composition; or literary work or translation. Some programs might require that the funding be spent on the creation of a new work; others may allow support for the exhibition or presentation of existing work.

  • Special opportunity grants. Grants for specific short-term projects, such as career-development or exhibition opportunities.

  • Commissions. A fee for the creation of a specific artwork. A commission may include additional supports or services such as materials, equipment, construction site, technical assistance/support, or a relationship with the granting organization or an affiliate for production, performance, or exhibition of the commissioned work.

  • Residency Grant. A Cash Grant/Monetary Award for the purpose of developing a residency project as arranged by the artist with a collaborating organization.


New Work

  • Program guidelines may stipulate that a grant award or residency must be used for the development or creation of new work, as opposed to the presentation or exhibition of existing work.


SERVICES AND PUBLICATIONS TOPICS

Services and Publications in NYFA Source have been classified according to the following informational topics and sub-topics. A "Service" listed in NYFA Source may provide information or access to information about a topic, or may actually perform or offer a service related to the topic. For example, a service organization might offer a database of health insurance providers, or may actually provide access to group health insurance.

1. Arts Education. The topics listed in this category relate to programs that provide education in the arts, ranging from elementary school art programs to graduate-level, certificate, workshop, and studio programs. Information in this category may serve artists seeking training or information about potential employment as teaching artists.

a) After School Art Programs in NYC for Elementary School Students. Includes information about all types of after school programs for elementary school students in NYC.

b) After School Art Programs in NYC for Middle/High School Students. Includes information about all types of after school programs for middle or high school students in NYC.

c) Apprenticeship/Internship Programs. This topic provides information about apprenticeship or internship study programs. In some cases, programs may require artists to pay a participation fee. If an Apprenticeship or Internship program carries a substantial benefit in terms of stipend, mentoring, or other services, and is offered through a competitive application process, the program will be found by searching in the Awards section of NYFA Source under Apprenticeship/ Professional Development.

d) Arts Education Programs (Grades K-12). This topic provides information about arts education programs in which artists can work as educators or "teaching artists."

e) Certificate Programs. This topic provides information about certificate programs for artist training.

f) Curriculum Resources. This topic provides information on developing lesson plans and curricula for arts-in-education programs. Includes on-line and print resources for sample lessons, and information on creating arts programs in classroom and community settings.

g) Graduate Degree Programs. This topic provides information about graduate or post-graduate degree programs for artist training.

h) Public Programs (Community-Based). This topic provides information about community-based public programs, in which artists can work as educators or "teaching artists" with the general adult public.

i) Undergraduate Degree Programs. This topic covers any resources available for programs conferring an undergraduate degree in any artistic discipline.

j) Workshops/Classes/Studio Programs (Technical Assistance). This topic covers any resources available for artists' professional development in various formal or informal ways including workshops, classes, or studio program formats.

k) Arts in Education Rosters. This topic provides information on rosters that make information on individual teaching or touring artists available to schools and other potential employers or presenters for arts in education programs.

2. Career Resources. This category includes topics useful in developing professional contacts, pursuing employment as an artist, and keeping abreast of the arts world.

a) Advocacy Organizations. This topic provides information about organizations that advocate about the arts or a particular artistic discipline to the federal, state and/or local government.

b) Audition Information. This topic provides resources for finding audition information.

c) Career Resources (How to be an Artist). This topic covers any resources available for career information.

d) Conferences (Career). This topic provides information about artist career conferences. Career conferences are generally concern professional advancement and not the presentation of artistic work (i.e. Siggraph).

e) Employment Information. This topic lists resources about employment information for artists.

f) Expositions/Fairs/Festivals (Artistic). This topic provides information about artistic expositions, fairs, or festivals that occur on an annual basis. Includes biennials, film festivals, performing arts festivals, etc. NYFA Source does not generally list contact information for an individual festival unless it sponsors an independent award (listed under Awards). This topic refers the artist to organizations, programs, or publications that provide comprehensive festival listings for a given discipline or disciplines. In some cases contact information has been included for festivals serving a specialized group or discipline which may not be listed elsewhere.

g) Magazines/Journals/Online Publications (General). This topic provides general information about arts magazines, journals, and online publications.

h) Professional Organizations/Unions. This topic provides information about professional organizations or unions for artists and other art professionals.

i) Registries/Directories. This topic provides information about artist registries and directories that make information on individual artists available to exhibitors, presenters, potential employers, or other artists/collaborators.

j) Discounted Tickets. This topic provides information about programs that offer discounted tickets to performances, exhibits, and other arts events.

3. Funding/Fundraising/Finance. Topics listed in this category relate specifically to funding and other money-related or financial issues, which may affect artists. Areas covered include fiscal sponsorship, credit and loan programs, fundraising/grantwriting advice and assistance, money management, financial and estate planning, and percent for art/public art commissioning programs.

a) Corporate Sponsorship of Events. This topic provides information about the corporate sponsorship of arts events.

b) Credit Unions. This topic provides information about credit unions open to artists.

c) Emergency Assistance. This topic covers any resources available for information about emergency funding or emergency-assistance programs. Programs that award emergency grants to artists through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Emergency Grants.

d) Financial Aid Programs (Certificate/Undergraduate/Graduate Students). This topic provides information about financial aid programs for certificate, undergraduate, or graduate school students in the arts.

e) Financial Planning/Pension Plans/Savings Plans. This topic provides information about financial planning, pension plans, or savings plans specifically useful to artists.

f) Fiscal Sponsorship Programs. This topic provides information about fiscal sponsorship, fiscal conduit, and non-profit umbrella programs, as well as any other resources about those programs.

g) Funding for Artists (Restricted and Unrestricted). This topic covers any resources available for information about restricted and unrestricted grants. Programs that actually award funding to artists through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Cash Grants/Monetary Awards.

h) Fundraising Information. This topic provides information about fundraising strategies for artist projects, including grantwriting instruction and technical assistance.

i) Loan Programs. This topic provides information about loan programs specifically useful to or geared toward artists.

j) Public Art Programs. This topic covers any resources available for information about public art programs (which exhibit or present artwork in a public context). Includes slide registries and public art committees that request proposals and award artist commissions on an as-needed basis. Programs that award public art commissions to artists through a regular, competitive application process are listed in the Awards section as restricted grants under Cash Grants/Monetary Awards.

k) Student Scholarships (Certificate/Undergraduate/Graduate Students). This topic provides information about scholarships for certificate, undergraduate, and graduate students in the arts. Programs that award scholarships through a competitive process are listed in the Awards section as Student Scholarships.

4. Business/Legal. This category includes topics relating to business, tax, accounting, and legal issues of specific interest to individual artists.

a) Accountants. This topic provides information about accountants who specialize in arts-related issues.

b) Artist/Agent/Manager/Gallery Relationship Information. This topic lists resources and information relating to the business relationships between an artist and an agent, manager, or gallery.

c) Business/Legal Information. This topic lists resources for business or legal information in general.

d) Contract Information. This topic lists resources and information relating to contracts for artists.

e) Copyright Information. This topic lists resources and information relating to copyright for artists.

f) Credit Card Processing. This topic provides information on credit card processing for artists involved in the sale of work.

g) Employing Personnel/Contracting for Services Information. This topic provides information about employing personnel (like a studio assistant) or contracting for services from other individuals or businesses.

h) Estate Planning Information. This topic lists resources and information relating to estate planning for artists.

i) Immigration Information. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to U.S. immigration laws and related issues for artists.

j) Income Tax Information. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to federal, state, and local income taxes and tax preparation for artists.

k) Incorporation Information. This topic lists resources and information relating to incorporation and other business structures for artists.

l) Lawyers. This topic provides information about lawyers who specialize in arts-related issues.

m) Licensing Information. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to licensing for artists.

n) Mailing Lists. This topic provides information about mailing lists for artists.

o) Marketing and PR Information. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to marketing, publicity, and public relations for artists in general.

p) Mediation Services. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to mediation of artists' business and legal disputes. Mediation is a method of resolving disputes without resorting to litigation. An independent third party, a mediator, hears both sides of a controversy and then helps disputants create their own solution.

q) Sales Tax Information. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to sales taxes.

r) Starting a Non-Profit Arts Organization. This topic lists resources and information for individual artists on starting a non-profit arts organization.

s) U.S. Customs Information. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to U.S. customs laws and regulations as they relate to artists.

t) Visa Information (Work/Study). This topic lists resources and information pertaining to work and study visas as they relate to artists.

5. Arts Professionals and Equipment. This category covers topics relating to arts professionals, technical services and service providers, equipment, and facilities that artists may need to access, consult, or contract for their work.

a) Accompanists. This topic provides information about accompanists.

b) Agents/Managers. This topic provides information about agents, managers, or any arts professional who serves as a business intermediary for artists with exhibitors or presenters, generally for a percentage fee.

c) Art Handlers/Shippers. This topic provides information about fine art handlers and shippers.

d) Casting Directors. This topic lists resources and information relating to casting directors.

e) Cinematographers/Director of Photography. This topic lists resources and information relating to cinematographers and directors of photography.

f) Coaches/Consultants. This topic provides information about coaches (e.g. voice, acting, etc.), consultants (e.g. script or publicity consultants), or any arts professional who provides training, instruction, or support to artists on a one-on-one basis.

g) Computer Software, Hardware & Training. This topic provides information about computer software, hardware, and training specifically geared to artists or the arts. Organizations or service programs that provide computer access to artists are included in this topic.

h) Conservation/Restoration/Preservation. This topic provides information about the conservation, restoration, and preservation of work, documentation of work, and other work-related ephemera.

i) Corporate Art Curators/Collections. This topic provides information about corporate art curators and collections (mostly in the visual arts).

j) Costume Suppliers. This topic provides information about costume suppliers.

k) Curators. This topic provides information about curators, or any arts professional who is responsible for conceiving, developing, organizing, and maintaining an exhibition, collection, compendium, or series of artistic works.

l) Dancewear & Equipment. This topic provides information about dancewear and dance equipment, including portable dance flooring.

m) Distributors (Film/Video/CD/DVD). This topic provides information about distributors of works on film, video, CD, and DVD.

n) Documentation of Work (Photo/Video/Audio/Digital). This topic lists resources and information pertaining to the documentation of work in photo, video, audio, or digital format. It also includes information about documentation services for hire.

o) Dramaturgs. This topic provides information about dramaturgs and literary managers.

p) Editors. This topic lists resources and information relating to editors (mostly in media and literary arts).

q) Ensembles/Companies/Groups. This topic provides information about performing arts ensembles, companies, troupes, and groups (e.g. music, dance, or theatre).

r) Film/Video/Audio Materials and Equipment. This topic provides information about materials and equipment for media production, including stock, expendables, vehicles, and production equipment rentals.

s) Film/Video/Audio Facilities. This topic provides information about facilities for film, video, and audio, including media post-production, editing, recording, sound mixing, transfer, dubbing, developing, printing, and cutting facilities.

t) Film/Video/Audio Crews. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to technicians, crew, and staff for film, video, and audio production.

u) Fine Art Appraisers. This topic provides information about fine art appraisers.

v) Healthcare (Physical/Psychological). This topic provides information about professionals and organizations that provide healthcare and mental health services for artists.

w) Libraries/Archives. This topic provides information about arts-related libraries and/or archives.

x) Make-Up, Media and Theatre. This topic provides information about make-up for theatre; film, video, and other recorded media.

y) Masks & Clowning Supplies. This topic provides information about masks and clowning supplies.

z) Music Copying. This topic provides information about music copying services.

aa) Musical Instrument Suppliers & Repair. This topic provides information about musical instrument suppliers and repair services.

bb) Publicity Materials & Printing Services. This topic provides information about printing and duplication services for artists' publicity needs.

cc) Producers (Independent). This topic provides information about independent producers (i.e. producers not affiliated with a specific performing arts venue or major film studio).

dd) Scripts & Scores. This topic lists resources for scripts and scores.

ee) Set/Lighting/Costume/Sound Designers. This topic provides information about set, lighting, costume, and sound designers.

ff) Sets & Properties. This topic provides information about sets and properties.

gg) Specialty Bookstores. This topic provides information about bookstores and other retailers that specialize in books relating to a particular artistic discipline or disciplines.

hh) Stage Managers. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to stage managers.

ii) Theater Technicians. This topic lists resources and information pertaining to theater technicians and staff.

jj) Translation/Film Subtitling. This topic provides information about translation and film subtitling services.

kk) Visual Arts Material Suppliers. This topic provides information about fine art material suppliers and services.

ll) Web Site Design and Hosting. This topic lists resources and information about web site design and hosting services that specialize in artists and the arts.

6. Insurance. This category includes topics relating to insurance for all personal and professional needs related specifically to individual artists.

a) Insurance (Equipment). This topic provides information about equipment insurance providers.

b) Insurance (Fine Art). This topic provides information about fine art insurance providers.

c) Insurance (Health/Dental/Disability/Life). This topic provides information about health, dental, disability, and life insurance providers and programs specializing in serving artists.

d) Insurance (Liability/Space). This topic provides information about liability and space insurance providers.

e) Insurance (Production). This topic provides information about production insurance providers.

f) Insurance (State Departments). This topic provides information about every state's insurance department.

7. Space (Information & Rentals). This category includes topics relating to live and work space for artists, both temporary and ongoing (rehearsal, studio, office), and includes residency information as well as information on workshop facilities, health, safety, and storage.

a) Artist Community/Artist-in-Residence Information (National). This topic covers all resources (organizations and publications) with information about artist communities and artist-in-residence programs on the national level. Programs that award residencies to artists free of charge or at a substantially subsidized rate through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs.

b) Artist Community/Artist-in-Residence Information (International). This topic covers all resources (organizations and publications) with information about artist communities and/or artist-in-residence programs on the international level. Programs that award residencies to artists free of charge or at a substantially subsidized rate through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Artist Community/Artist-in-Residence Information.

c) Arts in Community Residency Information. This topic covers all resources (organizations and publications) available for information about arts in the community residence programs. Programs that award residencies to artists free of charge or at a substantially subsidized rate through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs.

d) Arts in Education (K-12) Residency Information. This topic covers any resources (organizations and publications) available for information about arts in education (K-12) residence programs wherein the artist works as a teaching artist. Programs that award these residencies to artists through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs.

e) Housing Information & Subsidies. This topic provides information about housing programs and housing services for artists. May include information about programs that rent live-only or live/work space to artists. Programs that award free or substantially subsidized housing to artists through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs.

f) Foundries. This topic provides information about fine art foundries and services. Programs that award free or substantially subsidized equipment or facilities access on a competitive basis are listed in the Awards section under Equipment Access Awards.

g) Equipment Access & Rentals. This topic provides information about equipment access programs. These programs generally provide equipment to artists as a service (no formal application is needed), and artists may pay by the hour, day, or week to use the equipment. Programs that award free or substantially subsidized equipment or facilities access on a competitive basis are listed in the Awards section under Equipment Access Awards.

h) Health and Safety Information. This topic provides information about health and safety issues involved in art making. Areas covered include art materials, studio/rehearsal and performance environment, and issues of the body/ergonomics.

i) Print/Paper/Bookmaking Facilities. This topic provides information about printmaking workshops and services. Programs that award free or substantially subsidized equipment or facilities access on a competitive basis are listed in the Awards section under Equipment Access Awards or Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs.

j) Storage Facilities for Art Works/Equipment. This topic provides information about storage facilities for art works and equipment.

k) Studio/Rehearsal/Audition/Work Space Rentals & Information. This topic provides information about studio, rehearsal, audition, and work space programs and services for artists. Programs that award free or substantially subsidized space to artists through a competitive application process are listed in the Awards section under Space Programs or Artist Communities/Artist-in-Residence Programs.

8. Exhibition/Presentation/Publishing. This category includes topics related to the exhibition, presentation, screening, and publication of artistic work. It includes presenters, publishers, and exhibitors, as well as information on venues and spaces, and on self-presenting/producing/exhibiting.

a) Contest/Competition Information. This topic provides resources for finding contests and competitions in any discipline.

b) Gallery Information (Internet). This topic provides information about Internet or online galleries.

c) Gallery Information (Commercial). This topic provides information about commercial galleries.

d) Gallery Information (Non-Profit). This topic provides information about non-profit galleries.

e) Gallery Information (University). This topic provides information about university galleries.

f) Museums. This topic provides information about museums (mostly fine art, but not exclusively).

g) Performance Spaces. This topic provides information about performance space available to individuals or independent producers/presenters.

h) Presenting Organizations (Commercial). This topic provides information about commercial presenting organizations.

i) Presenting Organizations (Non-Profit). This topic provides information about non-profit presenting organizations.

j) Publishers (Artist Book Editions). This topic provides information about fine art book publishers.

k) Publishers (Books). This topic provides information about book publishers of literary works.

l) Publishers (Magazines/Journals). This topic provides information about magazines and journals that publish literary works.

m) Publishers (Musical Scores). This topic provides information about publishers of musical scores.

n) Publishers (Internet). This topic provides information about Internet or online publishers of literary works.

o) Publishers (Photography Editions). This topic provides information about fine art photography publishers.

p) Publishers (Play Scripts/Librettos). This topic provides information about publishers of play scripts or librettos.

q) Publishers (Printmaking Editions). This topic provides information about fine art printmaking publishers.

r) Publishers (Sculpture Editions). This topic provides information about fine art sculpture edition publishers.

s) Screening Spaces. This topic provides information about space and venues for screening film, video, or other recorded media, and that are available to individuals or independent producers/presenters. Where an organization presents or curates a screening series, the program will generally be listed under Presenting Organizations (Commercial) or Presenting Organizations (Non-Profit).

t) Self-Production/Self-Publishing Information. This topic provides information about artists self-producing or self-publishing their own work.

u) Touring & Booking Information. This topic provides information about arranging tours and booking venues for performing artists' work.

9. Accessibility for Special Audiences. This category includes topics related to the dissemination or presentation of literary and performance works to special audiences; and related technologies, such as braille or large-print publishers, books on tape, sign language, and captioning.


ORGANIZATION INFORMATION

Unconfirmed Records. In developing NYFA source, NYFA contacted each organization listed as offering an award program for artists to request a review of the program’s details. Due to the enormous range of programs identified and contacted (and the limited capacity of most nonprofit arts organizations!), a number of our program records remain unconfirmed. Records that have not been verified by the organization are marked with a triangle at the top of the organization record.

Address. The address listed in the Organization Information for each record is the general mail contact address for the organization that administers the program. When applying for an award or service, be sure to check the application guidelines for any delivery requirements or addresses specific to that program.

Phone/Fax/Email: Main contact numbers and general informational email contact for the Organization.

TTY Number. Where available, telephone numbers that accommodate hearing-impaired callers.

Executive Director. The administrative director of the organization.

Founding Year. The year in which the organization was first formed.

Incorporation Year. The year in which the organization was first incorporated or received its nonprofit status.

Mission Statement. The organization’s statement of purpose or mission; the guiding principle behind its activities and programs.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Program Contact. Denotes the administrator or preferred contact person for a particular program. Before contacting a program administrator, please be sure to review the Contact Requirements for the program.

Program Phone/Email. Direct telephone/email contact for the program.

Description of Program. Provides a brief description of the program’s structure and intent.

AWARD INFORMATION

Amount of Standard Award. When a program makes a standard grant, i.e. a $7,000 fellowship, the amount is entered here.

Maximum/Minimum Award. Where a program makes grants of varying amounts, the usual range of awards (minimum and maximum) is entered here.

Support or Services. Details any benefits, supports, or services provided as a component of an award. See Description of Support or Services for details.

Stipend. A monetary allowance provided in connection with a residency or apprenticeship/professional development program, usually to cover related living expenses or assist in the purchase of materials.

Housing/Subsidized Housing. A residency or professional development opportunity may supply housing free of charge, or at a substantially subsidized rental rate.

Studio Space/Subsidized Studio Space. A residency, space program, or professional development program may supply studio space free of charge, or at a substantially subsidized rental rate.

Facilities/Equipment Access. Access to specialized equipment or facilities, such as editing equipment, printmaking facilities, ceramics studio and kiln, etc. Residency facilities may include recreational and other living amenities, research libraries or other collections, etc.

Exhibition Space/Opportunity. Includes the opportunity to exhibit work to the public.

Performance Space/Opportunity. Includes the opportunity to present or perform work for the public.

Technical Support/Professional Development. May include training or coaching, assistance, instruction, or other technical support in the use of facilities and equipment; opportunities to develop and experiment with feedback or other support.

Master Artist Support/Mentorship. Includes interaction with an experienced master artist and mentorship programs.

Publication/Catalog. May include publication or published catalog of work created or awarded.

Insurance. Includes insurance provided for the term of the award program, be it personal coverage or coverage for works or equipment.

Documentation. Includes documentation/preservation of works created or awarded; e.g. through video, audiocassette, or CD recording.

Professional Contacts/Referrals. Includes opportunities to interact with professional contacts, introductions to buyers/sellers/presenters, etc.

Travel. Covers or reimburses travel costs; may include transportation to/from a residency site; travel and short-term accommodations for award presentation or related event.

Food. Provides, covers, or reimburses for food during the term of the award.

Duration of the Award. Refers to the span of time within which the award is to be enjoyed, or the awarded project must be completed.

Frequency of the Program. Refers to the frequency of the Program's application or award cycle, e.g. Annual, 2 cycles per year, Every 2 years, etc.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

Re-Applying. Artists who have previously received an award from a program may not be eligible to re-apply. Where programs allow grantees to re-apply, there may be restrictions on returning applicants, such as a waiting period or a maximum number of possible awards. Check the program’s guidelines for details. Where a program requires a Final Report from grantees, this obligation must usually be met before a new application may be submitted.

Other Restrictions. Any additional requirements or restrictions are summarized here. Always refer to the program’s posted or published guidelines, if available, for details.

SCOPE OF THE PROGRAM. Where available, statistics were entered for awards conferred in a program’s most recently recorded fiscal year. The number of recipients may differ from the number of awards, as in some cases an award may be shared by two or more artists.

Total Number of Applicants (annually)

Total Number of Recipients (annually)

Total Number of Awards (annually)

Total Amount Awarded by this Program (annually)

APPLICATION PROCEDURE

Open Application. Denotes a program that accepts applications from artists who satisfy the given eligibility criteria. Please be aware that an "Open" award program may have additional requirements, e.g. that the artist hold membership in a particular organization, or belong to a particular ethnic group. In addition, some programs charge an Application Fee. Nominated awards that allow artists to nominate themselves are also included under Open Application awards.

Not Open (e.g. by Nomination Only). Many of the cash grants and monetary awards made to artists cannot be applied for directly. Substantial awards are often made by nomination or election based on the artist’s established reputation in his or her discipline. These programs are included in NYFA Source to keep you informed about the range of supports and recognition accorded to artists in your field. Although you may not be able to apply directly for these awards, it may help you to know about the programs so you can stay abreast of the funding environment as you build career relationships and keep potential sponsors aware of the development of your work. Programs that confer awards by nomination are marked with a square at the top of the organization record.

Application through 501(c)(3) Sponsor only. Many foundations or corporate funders restrict grants to tax-exempt organizations. This application category denotes programs that allow individual artists to apply for project funding under the auspices of a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, acting as fiscal sponsor. To locate additional information on fiscal sponsorship or to search for fiscal sponsors in your region and discipline, search the Publications and Services section under Funding/Fundraising/Finance, Fiscal Sponsorship Programs.

Contact Requirements. The program administrator’s stated requirements or preferences for communication from potential applicants. In the interest of developing productive and respectful relationships with possible funders, please respect these instructions!

Application Materials/Process. Summarizes the application process and required materials. In some cases a written proposal or letter is requested, in others an application or entry form, tape audition, or cover letter and work sample. Please consult the program’s posted or published guidelines for additional details.

Application Fee. Many of the award programs and competitions listed charge a non-refundable application fee. Programs that require an application fee are marked with a circle at the top of the organization record.

Ideal Contact Month for New Application and Guidelines. Indicates the time of year the organization prefers to be contacted about applications and guidelines for a particular award program.

SELECTION AND NOTIFICATION

Selection Process/Criteria. Describes the review process (who and how), and the criteria upon which award decisions are made.

Notification Process. Describes how and when applicants and/or grantees are notified.

REPORTS AND REQUIREMENTS

Final Report Requirement. Most foundation and public (government) funders require grantees to report on the use and impact of awards received. Submission of a final report may be a condition for reapplying.

Public Service Requirement. Many grants require that the finished work be accessible to the general public, or that funded projects provide some significant community interaction or value. Public Service Requirement lists any obligations an artist must fulfill in exchange for an award or service. For example, an artist may be obligated to donate work or engage in public interactions, to teach or conduct workshops or demonstrations, or (in a residency, apprenticeship or equipment access program) commit to chores or studio maintenance.


DISCIPLINE

While some of the organizations and programs listed in NYFA Source serve a single artistic discipline or subdiscipline, others offer awards and services for a range of disciplines and subdisciplines. Please note that these are general working definitions and are not meant to describe every artist working in a form.

General. This indicates that to the best of our knowledge, the program covers all subdisciplines in the category. (A program classified as Dance, General, pertains to Ballet, Ballroom, Jazz, Modern, and Tap.)

Arts-Related Professionals. Professionals who work with and for artists in producing and disseminating their work, as well as artists who teach in educational or community settings. Includes Arts Administrators, Art Historians, Arts Policy Researchers, Conservators/Archivists, Curators, Dramaturgs, Tech/Production Staff, and Managers/Producers/Presenters, and Arts Education Professionals.

Dance. Includes Ballet, Ballroom, Jazz, Modern, Tap. May refer to Choreographers and Dancers.

Design Arts. Includes Architecture, Environmental Structures, Fashion Design, Graphic Design, Illustration, Industrial Design, Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning, Interior Design.

Environmental Structures. Architectural work that is situated in an open area but does not provide permanent shelter.

Industrial Design. Design for a mass-produced product. Urban Planning. Design for a populated area (city, town, roadway, ports, etc.).

Graphic Design. Includes interactive design.
Folk/Traditional Arts. Pertains to oral, customary, material, and performance traditions informally learned or self-taught and transmitted in contexts characteristic of ethnic, religious, linguistic, occupational, and regional groups. Includes Folk/Traditional Visual Arts, Dance, Design Arts, Music, Theater, and Literature.

Folk/Traditional Theater. Includes storytelling and oral traditions.
Literature. Includes Children's Literature, Creative Non-Fiction, Fiction, Hypertext Literature, Poetry, Translation, and Criticism/Arts Journalism.

Creative Non-Fiction. Literary work that is based on non-fiction, but creatively extends or exaggerates it.

Hypertext Literature. Literature that integrates new (computer) technologies to alter its form, content, and delivery.
Media Arts. Includes Film, Video/Digital, Television, Radio, and Computer Arts/New Media. Categories include Directors, Actors, or Writers. [Information may relate to programs serving "Filmmakers" or "Independent Producers" as well.] May cover Narrative, Documentary, Animation, or Experimental work.

Video/Digital. Work produced with a video or digital video camera. The final format has traditionally been a VHS cassette but now can also be an electronic DVD.

Computer Arts/New Media. Work produced with new technologies (such as computers), including web-based work.
Multidisciplinary. This term is used to identify a program that supports more than one discipline, e.g. Theatre, Dance, and/or Visual Arts.

Music. Includes Classical, Jazz, Blues, Popular, Opera, Musical Theatre, Experimental/New Music, and World Music. For Composers, Instrumentalists, Vocalists, Conductors, and Librettist/Lyricists. Orchestra, Chamber, Band, and Soloist. [Instruments are not broken out under discipline. Information on which instruments are served by a particular award program may be found under Description of Program or as an additional restriction under Eligibility Requirements.]

Classical. Music of the Classical Period, c. 1770-1830.

New Music. Contemporary music composed for concert performance.

Experimental. Contemporary music using nontraditional techniques and/or technology.

Jazz. Distinctly American musical idiom characterized by improvisation, blue notes and other elements that display its roots in blues and ragtime.

Blues. Largely songs of lament characterized by basic chord progressions.

Popular. Includes rock, rap, soul, gospel, and country.

Opera. A wholly or mostly sung drama written for operatic voices.

Musical Theater. A wholly or mostly sung drama written for musical theatre voices.

World Music. Popular musical works combining traditional melodies and/or rhythms from around the world with elements of jazz, rock and pop.
Performance Art. Interdisciplinary performed work that may involve visual arts, media, dance, music, theater, and literature.

Interdisciplinary. Refers to artists of different disciplines working collaboratively on a project (e.g. theater with video or visual art/installation with dance).

Theater. Includes Stage, Children's Theater, Circus/Clowning/Mime/Puppet, Improvisational Theater, Spoken Word/Storytelling, and Experimental. For Actors, Directors, Designers, and Playwrights.

Stage. Dramatic work scripted for presentation in a primarily theatrical space.

Spoken Word/Storytelling. Temporal performed narrative work involving literary or oral traditions.

Experimental Theater. Includes a number of different challenges to traditional theatrical forms. Also referred to as "alternative" and "avant-garde" theater; encompasses "postmodern" movements as well, often non-narrative, non-linear, and politically or ideologically based work. May be site-specific, or intended to be performed in non-traditional theatrical spaces.
Visual Arts. Includes Artists Books, Ceramics, Crafts, Drawing, Fiber, Glass, Installation, Murals, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, and Works on Paper. [For Metals and Wood, look under Crafts and/or Sculpture, depending on the program; or search by key word.]

Artists Books. Unique or editioned works of art based on an interpretation of the book format.

Crafts. Can be utilitarian, and uses utilitarian techniques and materials. May include quilting, jewelry, furniture design, beadwork, and more. Materials include wood, metals, leather, glass, ceramics, beads, textiles, and more.

Illustration. Includes cartoons/comics.

Installation. Created for and about a designated site or environment. Installations can be made with any material.

Murals. Images, frequently of large scale, painted on, applied directly to, relating to, or resembling, a wall or ceiling.

Works on Paper. Produced on, in, or from paper. Works on paper may incorporate any other materials.


LOCATION: GEOGRAPHIC ELIGIBILITY

Many of the programs, services, and publications in NYFA Source are intended to serve artists in a specific geographic area. Award programs may be international, national (in the case of the United States, eligible applicants include citizens, permanent residents, and inhabitants of Territories and Indian Nations), or may be restricted to a particular state, region, city/town, county/parish, or neighborhood/borough. Some services may also have geographic requirements, or a service or publication may simply be intended to benefit a particular area.

  • To search for programs that are open Internationally, click on "Programs Open to Applicants Worldwide." If you are searching from outside the U.S., please remember to check under "Additional Eligibility Requirements" in the program record. NYFA Source lists only those international programs that are open to U.S. artists; however, in some cases an "international" program in NYFA Source may be open to artists from the U.S. and several other specified countries, as opposed to artists from all countries.

  • To search for programs that are open to any U.S. citizen or permanent resident, click on "Programs Open to Applicants Living in Any U.S. State, Territory, or Indian Nation." Please be aware that some programs actually specify "U.S. Citizens only"--check the Other Restrictions under Eligibility Requirements in the program records.

  • To search for programs open exclusively to artists within your geographic region, start by designating the state in which you are currently a resident under "Programs Open Only to Applicants in a Specific State." Please be aware that many programs within a state may be restricted further by city, county, neighborhood, or borough. A search by state will call up all programs targeted for populations within a particular state or states. Most state or local programs have residency requirements ranging from 6 months to a year for eligibility.

  • To search for all programs for which you may be eligible geographically, try clicking on "Programs Open to Applicants Worldwide" and "Programs Open to Applicants Living in Any U.S. State, Territory, or Indian Nation" and selecting the state in which you reside.

  • Please note that the Geographic Eligibility fields in the Simple Search relate to the geographic location of the artist. Thus if you choose "Texas" you will pull up all the records that are restricted or specifically intended to serve artists in Texas. If you want to find out what programs are located in Texas (some of which may have a national focus), go to the Advanced Search and enter TX under Organizational contact information.

DEADLINE
Award Programs may accept applications on an ongoing or annual basis, may have two or more cycles per year, or may offer awards less frequently, such as biannually or even every three or four years.

A. Exact Deadline. Exact deadlines have been provided where available, and will be updated on an ongoing basis. You can search NYFA Source's Advanced Search for current opportunities by selecting dates from the drop-down boxes under the Exact Deadline field (e.g., Between December 1, 2002 and January 31, 2003). Please be aware that only exact deadlines can be searched in this fashion.

1. Postmark vs. Delivery Deadlines. Programs differ as to whether the stated deadline is a postmark deadline (i.e. applications must be postmarked by this date in order to be eligible) or delivery deadline (i.e. the date by which applications must be received in the organization's offices). Please check the guidelines issued by the program to be certain, and be aware of any delivery restrictions (U.S. postal mail, FedEx, UPS, etc.).

B. Approximate Deadline. Where an exact deadline could not be obtained for a program, approximate deadlines were noted where available (i.e. "October," or "early October"). Where a program offers more than one cycle per year, the deadlines are also noted under approximate deadline (i.e. 10/1, 5/15).

C. Rolling Deadline. This indicates that a program accepts applications on an ongoing basis, with no set deadline or cutoff point, or that applications received after a "deadline" are rolled over for consideration into the next cycle. A program that operates on a rolling deadline may list exact or approximate dates when a Board or Committee meets to review proposals.

D. Rotating Disciplines. Some multidisciplinary programs rotate the disciplines they fund from one cycle to the next. For example, this year they may fund visual arts and literature, the following year performing arts. Please be sure to double-check the guidelines issued by the program for the current year's eligibility requirements.


OTHER CRITERIA: RESTRICTIONS AND ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

An Award Program, Service, or Publication may be restricted to, or focused on serving, a particular group or groups.

A. PERSONAL ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS

1. Gender Requirement

a) Men Only/Women Only. Programs may be restricted by gender, particularly those which are intended to encourage the participation of women in a given discipline or genre.

2. Age Requirement. Many award programs specify a maximum or minimum age, or both, for eligible applicants. Be sure to check for these restrictions in the program record. Because age specifications vary so widely by program, NYFA Source does not include a search by these qualifications. Look for programs geared toward younger artists or older artists by searching under Emerging, Established/Midcareer, and Master/Elder Artists.

3. Ethnicity Requirement. A program may be restricted to, or focused on providing opportunities for, one or more ethnic or cultural groups. The following categories are listed in NYFA Source and may be used as search criteria in the Advanced Search function. The classifications and definitions used in NYFA Source are based on standards for data on race and ethnicity established in 1999 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Definitions employed by individual organizations and programs may vary. Programs in NYFA Source may specify other/additional groups in their eligibility requirements; see program details and ¡§Other¡¨ under Ethnicity Requirement.

a) Black/African American. A person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. This definition includes native-born Black Americans, Africans, Haitians, and residents of non-Spanish speaking Caribbean Islands of African descent.

b) American Indian/Alaskan Native. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.

c) Asian. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

d) Caucasian/White. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

e) Latino/Hispanic. A person of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

f) Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander. A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

4. Career Point Requirement. NYFA Source uses Career Point categories broadly. Emerging refers to artists who are just starting out in their careers; Mid-Career or Established to those who have been working and exhibiting or presenting professionally for some time; and Master or Elder to those who have, through a lifetime of work in a particular discipline, reached a high level of accomplishment or recognition. Distinctions entered for a particular program are based, wherever possible, on the language employed by the administering organization.

5. Education/Training Requirement. Many award programs are not open to students or to artists currently enrolled in a degree program in the related discipline. Such programs will be marked "Not Open to Students." Other programs may be intended to support artists or artists-in-training from a specific student group (primary, secondary, undergraduate, or graduate); recent graduates (post-graduate students); or artists at the apprentice level in a given craft or discipline, and will be marked as follows:

a) Primary School Student

b) Secondary School Student

c) Undergraduate Student

d) Graduate Student

e) Post-Graduate Student

f) Apprenticeship

Please note: These requirements relate to the applicant's current status as a student, and are not meant to denote a level of training required in order to be eligible for a particular program.

6. Special Population Requirement. Some of the award programs and services listed in NYFA Source are intended specifically to support or encourage the participation of individuals from a particular population or group, e.g. a grant to encourage lesbian or gay filmmakers or a service or professional membership organization for performers with disabilities. Emergency funding or other services may be intended specifically to assist artists with HIV/AIDS or a terminal illness. NYFA Source lists the following "special populations," which may also be used as search criteria in the Advanced Search function. Programs may specify other/additional groups in their eligibility requirements; see program details and "Other" under Special Population Requirements.

a) Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Transgender

b) Disabled

c) HIV/AIDS/Terminal Illness

7. Other Restrictions. This field lists additional restrictions on eligibility not captured elsewhere in the database record. Please be aware that the NYFA Source record only summarizes program requirements, and that programs revise their eligibility requirements on an ongoing basis. Always review the organization¡¦s own published (print or online) guidelines for details about program mission, eligibility requirements, funding criteria, and application procedures before submitting an application or proposal.
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